The Knights Templar and Muslims


The Knights Templar is feasibly one of the most influential and powerful organizations in history. Even centuries after their trial, the world is still talking about the order and unrevealing its secrets. The monastic order started in the Middle East to protect traveling Christian pilgrims from burglary. However, they soon expanded their monastery and duties in the Holy Land and also in Europe. The Knight's Templars were involved in battles, trading, and also banking, which helped them build connections with various groups, such as the Crusaders and also the Saracens.

It is a common idea that the Templars were at war with the Muslims throughout the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. However, that may not be entirely true. In fact, during their last trial, when the King of France executed the Templars, they were accused of being in league with the Muslims.

Although it is a bit unreasonable to talk about a friendship between the Muslims and the Knights, the connection between the two is far more complicated than what it is advertised. At battle with the Muslim armies, the Templars showed bravery and fearlessness.  As they had great material sources and swore to fight for God, the monks founded the Crusaders, who were considered the greatest enemy of the Saracens and who were responsible for keeping Christianity alive in the Middle East. Although it is unfair to say that Islam set the ground for the templars, many Christian variants were suppressed in Europe but still operated in the east, where Islam was dominant.

The Templar's connection to the Muslims grew beyond the battles. The order's commercial, religious and diplomatic situation in the Middle East between the 12th and the 13th century is still studied by historians today. Given the fact that the Templars were warriors and not scholars, much of their history was undocumented, and their records were destroyed after the trial, which explains why there is so much cloudiness surrounding the organization.


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