Architecture of the Knights Templar


The Templars Castle in London, England.

 

The Knights Templar is a historic Christian monastic order. Originally known as the Knights of the Temple of Solomon, in reference to where the order was first created, the Templars deeply influenced the history of Christianity and how orders are perceived. 

The organization was, and still, fascinating on so many levels. First, the Templars were the first monks' warriors in history, which inspired the legend of King Arthur and The Holy Grail. On the other hand, the Templars' incredible war tactics and devotion to their banner are remarkable and still studied today by historians. 

One of the most enchanting parts about the Templars is their architecture. The monks were ambitious and determined builders who shaped the mist for their architecture following the Byzantines. 

Here are some of the most interesting elements of their architecture: 

Battlements: Most of their castles had battlements as defenses to the wall. It consists of a walking wall with a top ridge. 

Concentric: It's a favourite castle for the Knights Templar. It comprises a sequence of walls around the castle. If enemies attack a wall, they will find themselves trapped in a small alley that leads to another wall. 

Gatehouse: The entries to the Templars castles were thoroughly secured and protected by a drawbridge. On both sides of the cake, you'll fund towers. Being the easiest entrances to the castles, gatehouses were usually fortified. 

The Great Hall: Each castle has a main social center, which serves as a reception for ceremonies and dining.

The Keep: The Templars spent most of their day training for battles or battling, which is why a central keep was necessary at each castle. It's a large central tower, which is the last resort in case of an attack when all the defenses have failed. 

In addition to the tangible architectural impact they left on the world, the Templars were also skilled bankers, warriors, and traders. 

 


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